Search results for 'censorship'

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Julian Assange

Julian Assange, born 3 July 1971) is an Australian journalist,publisher, and Internet activist. He is the spokesperson and editor in chief for WikiLeaks, a whistleblower website. Before working with the website, he was a computer programmer and hacker. He has lived in several countries, and has made occasional public appearances to speak about freedom of the press, censorship, and investigative journalism.

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Aaron Swartz

Aaron Swartz is the founder of Demand Progress, which launched the campaign against the Internet censorship bills (SOPA/PIPA) and now has over a million members. He is also a Contributing Editor to The Baffler and on the Council of Advisors to The Rules.

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Daoud Kuttab

Daoud Kuttab is a former Ferris Professor of Journalism at Princeton University ('07-'08). While at Princeton he taught a seminar on new media in the Arab world. Kuttab is a Palestinian journalist and media activists. Born in Jerusalem in 1955, Kuttab studied in the United States and has been working in journalism ever since 1980.

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Drazen Pantic

Mathematician and open-source developer Drazen Pantic was deeply involved with Serbian Radio B92 in Pozarevac, Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic's home town.

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    Luther Blissett

    "Luther Blissett" is a multi-use name, an "open reputation" informally adopted and shared by hundreds of artists and social activists all over Europe since summer 1994.

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      event

      WikiLeaks statement on the mass recording of Afghan telephone calls by the NSA 

      Friday 23 May 2014, 05:00 GMT

      The National Security Agency has been recording and storing nearly all the domestic (and international) phone calls from two or more target countries as of 2013. Both the Washington Post and The Intercept (based in the US and published by eBay chairman Pierre Omidyar) have censored the name of one of the victim states, which the latter publication refers to as country "X".

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       VakuumTV

      VakuumTV was founded in February 1994 on the initiative of László Kistamás. Its members presented weekly broadcasts on Monday nights at the most popular cultural club in Budapest, Tilos az Á.

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      Anonymous statement: Operation Egypt 

      Dear Citizens of the World

      Anonymous can not, and will not stand idly while people are being denied their basic rights and human liberties. Yet, there are still a lot of governments worldwide who fail to even aspire to the standard of freedom that was set by the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. These governments believe they have the right and privilege to impose upon their own people an 'official' version of 'reality' which isn't in any way tampered by the truths of everyday life under which its citizens are living. Anonymous believes this is an outright crime which can not go unpunished.

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      Vakuum TV 

      VakuumTV was founded in February 1994 on the initiative of László Kistamás. Its members presented weekly broadcasts on Monday nights at the most popular cultural club in Budapest, Tilos az Á. Needless to say, the designation 'VakuumTV' was not meant to refer to any kind of conventional television channel which could be received on TV sets in commercial circulation. Rather, its founders envisioned a live show in which a large frame separating the stage from the audience imitates the experience of watching TV for the audience. Thus VakuumTV can be received only where this frame is set up.

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      Operation: Payback 

      To whom it concerns,

      Over the past years, we have borne witness to a technological revolution. The individual has become free, in the most extreme anarchistic sense, to share ideas. Some of these ideas are shared behind proxies, darknets, or similar ?closed doors?. Nevertheless, the ideas are out there. There have been similar instances of such revolutions of the mind. Their effects on society are inestimably great. As in past times with the invention of the printing press, so it is today that the people embrace this revolution, this new ?anarchy? of freedom to share, while their autocratic rulers seek to crush this freedom.

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